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Jez's Notebook | Hints & Tips for Booking a Conference Speaker or Host Archive

We’ll Pay You Later

Imagine that today your computer broke. They sometimes – thankfully rarely, although usually when you really need them or are in the middle of something important – transition rapidly from absolutely fine to complete meltdown.

Well, imagine that happened at work. You’ve no backup computers and the long term solution is, of course, to replace the computer. You’re going to need to buy one but when you call the computer supplier, you tell them that you want the computer now but won’t pay them until three months time.

Or imagine that you decide you’re going to all get together and have a nice coffee from the independent coffee shop near your office, sending out someone to get takeaway coffees every lunchtime. When you order them you tell the coffee shop owner that you’ll pay them in three months time.

There is an increasing trend by organisations – large organisations with tens of millions of pounds of profit – to tell suppliers their

Should A Conference Be An Experience? 2016 is the year of experience.

Jez Rose stretches training expectations and experiences.

Jez Rose stretches training expectations and experiences.

2016 is the year of experience.

Because we all want great experiences in life – I’ve never met anyone who actively seeks out terrible experiences. Especially if we’re attending a conference or meeting; sat all day inside a conference room.

Most of us are also keen on delivering great experiences, too. It’s this very reason that I started accepting invitations to speak at conferences and meetings: I wanted to shake up the accepted norm of the conference industry and help people wake up to just how exciting and enjoyable learning could be.

However, while any event or conference or meeting where training is taking place absolutely must be about the experience delegates have, it is critical to remember that it’s about their experience. Too many conference organisers focus on what they want their experience of it to be, based on their agenda.

The most common question I’m asked: Why did I become a motivational speaker?

Jez Rose considers his title vile and believes he is an "accidental motivational speaker".

Jez Rose considers his title vile and believes he is an “accidental motivational speaker”.

I’m asked that question a lot. It’s not exactly at the top of the Careers Advisor’s list of potential career pathways for most 17 year olds. I don’t even remember “guest speaker” being on the list. I took those personality and career tests at school and they suggested I became either a nanny, undertaker or cleaner. Make of that what you will.

Well, the truth is I didn’t intend to become a motivational speaker and actually hate the term, as I’ve written about in other blogs. For a start, most people shudder, or at least screw up their nose when they hear the phrase “motivational speaker”. It’s a vile phrase and when you consider the practicalities of motivating large audiences of people (my audiences range from 50 to over 3,000 individuals), an impossible task.

My story is genuinely one of those “I just stumbled into it” ones. I had no plan to do this and when people ask me how to get into it, it’s a tough one to answer. However, in itself it does provide a useful answer, I believe. If you really want to do something, you’ll find a way to do it. If you don’t get round to doing it, you didn’t want to do it enough. It’s as simple as that. Whether you want to speak at conferences or own your own flower shop, grow your own business, or progress through the corporate ranks, it boils down to

What’s the difference?! “Book Motivational Speaker”, “Hire Keynote Speaker”, “Book Guest Speaker”

Are you searching for a motivational speaker? Have you typed into Google “book guest speaker”, or “hire keynote speaker” to help find some suggestions for your conference speaker slot? Did you know that a motivational speaker, guest speaker and keynote speaker are, technically, all quite different things?

As a professional speaker for the past 12 years, I’ve written this handy guide to help you get exactly what you want, with the minimum of awkward surprises!

“Jez Rose is mad – but he’s the best!” – Why does it work?

Some people have said my style is “unconventional”; “out of this world” and “highly energetic” – in fact a client recently said of me in their industry magazine: “Jez Rose is mad – but he’s the best!”. I know my presentations are fun, as that’s intentional, but there’s a serious, scientific foundation to my method…

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Humans have pretty poor attention spans, generally. Getting 250 people together in a room, each with their own desires, learning needs and interests means you’re always going to struggle with maintaining everyone’s attention. Natural peaks and drops in the attention of your delegates is normal, however, it can be quite dramatic. The graph below shows how attention span dwindles over time and is immediately perked after a break – that’s why everyone charges out at the slightest hint that there is a coffee break approaching – they need it!

Getting the most from an external speaker – the secrets to hiring a good conference speaker

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For the full article, head over to the Free Resources area at www.thebehaviourexpert.com!

When choosing a keynote speaker to speak at your conference or event, it is important to view it as the important investment that it is.  I have heard of – and seen – many professional conference speakers with excellent reputations and glowing testimonials, deliver presentations that are not well received.

These secrets will help maximise your ROI and ensure you get the best from your chosen business speaker:

As a recent client of mine from P&G quite rightly said to me: “time is of secondary importance”.  Cut the speaker’s allotted time at your peril. Professional conference speakers spend a lot of time and effort perfecting their presentation to create something powerful, which hopefully inspires and motivates: you are investing in a specialist in their field to speak to you.  If you reduce the time the speaker has to effectively deliver their presentation, you not only reduce the impact but it almost always doesn’t allow time to have the impact you hoped for.

Allow time for the keynote speaker to sound check.  This is critical.  If you cannot hear the conference speaker properly, the entire presentation will be tainted .  There’s nothing worse than trying to listen to someone when the microphone keeps cutting out or is distorted.  People simply lose interest and then you’ve wasted your investment.